Day 61 - Cardiac Exams (24/11/2017)

As I mentioned yesterday, got back from the pub very late and felt like death when I woke up a mere few hours later. Also managed to just about make it through the Anatomy teaching session without having completed the workbook, at least without coming off like a COMPLETE moron. Admittedly the demonstrators never bully anyone and will happily explain things to you time and again if you so wish. I quite enjoy the structures of the larynx because they're easy to palpate on yourself - in my case they're quite pronounced.

Both this week and last week we've had all our teaching in the Clinical Sciences Building - normally only our 8am lecture and clinical skills sessions are in there and then the further teaching (anatomy, radiology) etc happens in the Surgical Training Centre in the depths of the main hospital building. It's been super-convenient for a change, particularly with a useful library being located in the same area. In between scheduled activities we've been able to get work done, which noticeably more and more people have been doing. I've said it before, but it's pretty clear that everyone is feeling the stress. It's oddly unifying in a way. I felt myself starting to nod in radiology (the rooms have to be dark) but thankfully I had a combination of caffeine tablets and Lucozade on hand.

Our little hub

Our little hub

In the afternoon we had a reasonably long free period, which I used to investigate a few different anatomy learning tools, eventually settling on one recommended by my housemate known as Complete Anatomy 5, from 3D4Medical. As it was Black Friday today, they were having an 80% discount on the package, so I snapped it up for a princely $10.

3D4Medical Complete Anatomy 5

3D4Medical Complete Anatomy 5

Safe to say, I'm a fan. You can click on a particular element to bring up information on it (including surface anatomy markers), and selectively remove entire systems or individual pieces as required. Better yet, the Windows version actually supports touch input, meaning I can use my laptop's tablet mode to interact with it more fluidly - you can even make notes in 3D or cut out sections to peek inside the resulting hole.

We ended the day with cardiac exams, featuring yours truly as the shirtless guinea pig - I swear I'm not in any way an exhibitionist, there's just always an awkward pause when volunteers are asked for. It just makes thing much faster if I do it and we can get on with it. The main new techniques essentially involved palpating and auscultating for particular heart sounds - those made by contractions of the heart and activity of its valves. It also turned out that one of our coursemates had an unusual three-sound heartbeat, so that was cool. Imagine the typical 'lub-dub sound', but with 'dub' split into two equally short, similar sounds - this is apparently called a 'gallop rhythm'.